• Miles of uncrowded white sandy beaches extend to the horizon, separating the clear blue ocean and undulating grass-covered dunes.

    Fire Island

    National Seashore New York

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Pet Restrictions in Effect March 15 through Labor Day

    Dogs/other pets (except for service animals) are not allowed in the wilderness or on any of Fire Island's federally owned oceanfront beaches from March 15 through Labor Day to help protect threatened and endangered beach-nesting shorebirds. More »

  • Backcountry Camping Permit and Access Procedures

    Reservations for required permits must be obtained through www.recreation.gov. Due to the breach at Old Inlet, access to both east and west wilderness camping zones must now be from Watch Hill or points west, and involve a 1½ to 8 mile hike. More »

  • Attention Watch Hill Ferry Passengers

    Due to channel conditions, delay or cancellation of ferry service between Patchogue and Watch Hill may occur. For updated ferry schedule information, please call 631-475-1665.

Permits for Special Events & Activities

The National Park Service is directed to to conserve park resources "unimpaired" for the enjoyment of future generations. Therefore, any activities that would cause derogation of or detract from the values and purposes for which a park has been established cannot be allowed.

Fire Island National Seashore was established in September 1964 (Public Law 88-587) for the purposes of "conserving and preserving for the use of future generations certain relatively unspoiled and undeveloped beaches, dunes, and other natural features within Suffolk County, New York, which possess high values to the Nation, as examples of unspoiled areas of great natural beauty in close proximity to large concentrations of urban populations."

Providing opportunities for appropriate public enjoyment is an important part of the National Park Service mission. Approval of any special uses of the park—unrelated to public enjoyment—may be allowed if not otherwise prohibited by law or regulation. However, the National Park Service can only allow uses that are (1) appropriate to the purpose for which the park was established, and (2) can be sustained without causing unacceptable impacts.

Please keep these requirements in mind if you are considering a request for special use of facilities or resources at Fire Island National Seashore.

 

Special Park Uses
A special park use is defined as an activity that takes place in a park area, and that:

  • provides a benefit to an individual, group or organization rather than the public at large;
  • requires written authorization and some degree of management control from the National Park Service in order to protect park resources and the public interest;
  • is not prohibited by law or regulation;
  • is not initiated, sponsored, or conducted by the National Park Service; and
  • is not managed under a concession contract, a recreation activity for which the NPS charges a fee, or a lease.
 

Appropriate Permit Conditions are imposed for Special Use Permits for Public Gatherings.

Special Use Permit Application
Follow the directions found in the form above (pdf file, Adobe Acrobat reader required), then mail the completed form to the park headquarters address. Forms will only be accepted via U.S. Mail. Forms that have been faxed or e-mailed will not be accepted for consideration.

A non-refundable application fee is required. Additional administrative, location, and/or cost recovery fees may also be charged.

 

For More Information
Please contact the park's Special Park Uses Coordinator via e-mail or call 631-687-4758.

Did You Know?

Close-up view of pinkish sundew plants, bright green mosses, and spike-like leaves of other plants.

Tiny insectivorous plants called sundews (Drosera rotundifolia and D. intermedia) may be found in the low moist swales between dunes in the Fire Island wilderness area. Sundew gets its name from the glistening sticky substance on its leaves that traps ants and other small insects. More...