• Pa-Hay-okee Overlook

    Everglades

    National Park Florida

Carl Ross and Frank Key Channels Annual closure 2013

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Date: November 29, 2013
Contact: General Park Information, 305-242-7700
Contact: Lori Oberhofer, Wildlife Biologist, 305-242-7889
Contact: Media Inquiries: Linda Friar, 305-242-7714

HOMESTEAD, Florida: In a continuing effort to protect Roseate Spoonbills in Florida Bay, Everglades National Park will close Carl Ross Key and Frank Key Channel to public entry during the winter nesting season. These temporary closures are intended to provide added protection for two of Florida Bay's most significant spoonbill colonies.

Nesting spoonbills can be easily spooked by passing boats and other human activity, prompting them to leave their nests and expose their eggs and young to predators such as vultures and crows.

Both Sandy Key and Frank Key have been permanently closed to public entry for more than 20 years to protect these nesting colonies.

In light of this threat, Everglades National Park will close Carl Ross Key to all public entry during the nesting season. In addition, the park will close the channel running along the west end of Frank Key to protect the Frank Key colony. Park patrols of Carl Ross, Sandy and Frank Keys will be increased during the 2013-2014 nesting season to ensure that the spoonbills are protected and that these closures are observed.

The Park is working with local anglers and boaters to help inform the public and visitors of these temporary closures and provide information about the threats to spoonbills and the rationale for these actions.

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Did You Know?

Wood Stork

A pair of endangered wood storks need about 440 pounds of fish during a breeding season to feed themselves and their young. Everglades National Park serves as an important nursery ground for raising their chicks.