• Pa-Hay-okee Overlook

    Everglades

    National Park Florida

Park Celebrates Archeology Month with Calusa Days at the Gulf Coast Visitor Center

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: March 20, 2012
Contact: General Park Information, 239-695-3311
Contact: Media Contact Linda Friar, 305-242-7714

 

On March 31st & April 1st, celebrate Florida Archeology Month at Everglades National Park. Learn about the prehistory and archaeological resources in the Ten Thousand Islands of Southwest Florida. Visit the Turner River and Sandfly Island shell mounds, learn about how the Calusa lived, and try your hand at tool making, atlatl throwing, mask painting, and more. Join us for fun activities at the Gulf Coast Visitor Center in Everglades City, FL. Call for more information: 239-695-3311. Activities are free except for the boat and canoe tours to the shell mounds.

March 31: Boat Tour to Turner River Mounds - Motorized boat tours will leave at 9:00 & 9:15 am, 11:00 & 11:15 am, and 1:00 & 1:15 pm and will include a thirty-minute stop and walk at the Turner River complex site. Visitors should arrive at least 15 minutes before hand. The tours cost $35 per adult (regular boat tour price). Reservations for these tours can be made at: www.evergladesnationalparkboattoursgulfcoast.com (Select "Mangrove Wilderness" tour)

April 1: Boat Tour to Sandfly Island - This will be a special boat tour at 11:00 am that includes a stop and short walk on Sandfly Island, a prehistoric shell mound site. Reservations can be made at: www.evergladesnationalparkboattoursgulfcoast.com (select "10,000 Islands"). The tour costs $26.50 (regular boat tour price).

March 31 & April 1: Canoe Tour to the Turner Mounds (2 hours) - The trip will include a stop at the Turner River complex site and a ranger presentation on Calusa history. Bring your own canoe or rent one. Canoe rental is $26. Canoes can hold 2 or 3 people. Singles can pay for ½ a canoe. 10 am to 12 pm. Call for reservations (239-695-3311).

Did You Know?

Manatee and Baby Swimming

Mermaid sightings have been reported by sailors throughout history who often blamed the part-woman, part-fish beings for leading them astray. But folklore experts believe that what those sailors were seeing were not mermaids, but rather air-breathing manatees, or their dugong relatives.