• Pa-Hay-okee Overlook

    Everglades

    National Park Florida

Everglades Catch Log

The sportfish monitoring program of Everglades National Park compiles information on the capture and harvest of fish in our coastal waters. These long-term data are important to assess the continued health of fish stocks in the park.

 
 
Do You Need to Submit a Catch Log?
 

Not all anglers in Everglades National Park are required to submit information. Only permitted fishing guides are required to submit monthly catch log data. These guides are required to submit catch information for all chartered trips, including those during which nothing is caught.

 

To submit a catch log proceed below, otherwise, return to the park homepage.

 
Know Your Location
 
Thumbnail of Zone Map


Everglades National Park
For the purposes of data collection, park waters been divided into eleven survey zones. All online catch submissions must include this location information.

A map is available for reference.

 
Thumbnail of Dry Totugas Zone Map

Dry Tortugas National Park

For the purposes of data collection, park waters been divided into ten survey zones. All online catch submissions must include this location information.

A map is available for reference.
 
Fill Out & Submit Your Form
 

Catch information should be submitted on a monthly basis using our fillable spreadsheet. Once complete, a copy of the file should be saved locally for the permitees records. A copy of the file should be sent as an attachment to EVER_guidefishing@nps.gov

 
Everglades Logbook Spreadsheet

Submit Your Monthly
Everglades Catch Information

XLS, 100 KB

For best results, please save this file to your computer first!

 
Spreadsheet Thumbnail

Submit Your Monthly
Dry Tortugas
Catch Information

XLS, 100 KB

For best results, please save this file to your computer first!

 
Need Help?
 

For help regarding the submission process, or to leave a comment or suggestion, please feel free to contact us here.

Did You Know?

Baby alligator

Female alligators will vehemently protect their nests and their young until they reach one to two years of age. Keep your eyes out for baby alligators in the Everglades - they're about a foot long with yellow stripes.