• Pa-Hay-okee Overlook

    Everglades

    National Park Florida

CESI Research Project 99-3

Baseline Research >> Current Page
 

Effects of Fire on the Cape Sable Seaside Sparrow
Julie L. Lockwood, David A. La Puma, Phillip Cassey, Michelle J. Davis & Katherine H. Fenn

 
RES03-3BodyImage
The Endangered Cape Sable Seaside Sparrow
National Park Service Photo by Lori Oberhofer
 

The endangered Cape Sable Seaside Sparrow is one of South Florida's most imperiled species. The range of the diminutive bird is found almost entirely within the boundaries of Everglades National Park. Because sparrows construct their nests near the ground, both natural and human-caused changes to these areas can have significant implications for breeding populations.

This CESI-funded study examines the impacts to known sparrow populations following a particularly intense wildfire in 2001. The investigation offers new analysis on previous long-term population surveys and makes several recommendations on methodology for use in future range-wide surveys.

 
 

FOR DOWNLOAD

 
Fact Sheet Image

Project Fact Sheet
Hi Res, 1.5 MB | Lo Res, 250 KB

 
Report Cover

Annual Report
(PDF, 440 KB)

 
 

RELATED PUBLICATIONS

 

Cassey, P., J.L. Lockwood, K.H. Fenn. 2007. Using long-term occupancy information to inform the management of Cape Sable seaside sparrows in the Everglades. Biological Conservation 139, 139-149.

La Puma, D.A., J.L. Lockwood, M.J. Davis. 2007. Endangered species management requires a new look at the benefit of fire: The Cape Sable seaside sparrow in the Everglades ecosystem. Biological Conservation 136, 398-407.

 
 
 

Contact the principal investigator directly with questions about this study.

 
Cape Sable, Seaside Sparrow, Julie Lockwood, David LaPuma, Phillip Cassey, Michelle Davis, Katherine Fenn, Endangered, Fire, CESI, Critical Ecosystem Studies Initiative, Population, Everglades, National Park

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