• Pa-Hay-okee Overlook

    Everglades

    National Park Florida

Butterfly Species

Some of the nearly 100 butterfly species that inhabit Everglades National Park are pictured below.

Please remember that collection of wildlife and plants in national parks is strictly prohibited.

 

Gossamer-Wings

 
Atala butterfly

NPS photo by William Perry

Atala (Eumaeus atala florida)

 
Bartram’s Scrub-Hairstreak

NPS photo by William Perry

Bartram's Scrub-Hairstreak (Strymon acis bartrami)

 
Silver-banded hairstreak

NPS photo by Jimi Sadle

Silver-banded Hairstreak (Chlorostrymon simaethis)

 

Brushfoots

 
Common Buckeye

NPS photo

Common Buckeye (Junonia coenia)

 
Florida leafwing butterfly

NPS photo by Jimi Sadle

Florida Leafwing (Anaea troglodyta floridalis)

 
Gulf Fritillary

NPS photo by William Perry

Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae)

 
Julia Heliconian

NPS photo by William Perry

Julia Heliconian (Dryas iulia)

 
Malachite

NPS photo by Hank Poor

Malachite (Siproeta stelenes)

 
Ruddy daggerwing

NPS photo by Jimi Sadle

Ruddy Daggerwing (Marpesia petreus)

 
Viceroy

NPS photo

Viceroy (Basilarchia or Limenitis archippus)

 
White Peacock

NPS photo by William Perry

White Peacock (Anartia jatrophae)

 
Zebra Heliconian or Longwing

NPS photo

Zebra Heliconian or Longwing (Heliconius charithonia)

 

Skippers

 
Florida duskywing

NPS photo by Jimi Sadle

Florida Duskywing (Ephyriades brunneus floridensis)

 
Long-tailed Skipper

NPS photo

Long-tailed Skipper (Urbanus proteus)

 
Tropical checkered skipper

NPS photo by Jimi Sadle

Tropical Checkered-Skipper (Pyrgus oileus)

 
 

 

FOR DOWNLOAD

Butterfly Checklist for Everglades National Park

Technical Report T-588: Butterflies of Everglades National Park
by Barbara Lenczewski
Everglades National Park, South Florida Research Center
1980, 110 pp.
(PDF, 2.1 MB)

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

The Everglades Ecosystem provides a home to over 350 documented species of birds. Numerous visitors make the journey to the park every year to see some of our more rare and endangered species.