• Black and white photo of a girl and her family on a canal packet boat in Rochester, NY

    Erie Canalway

    National Heritage Corridor New York

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is a Heritage Corridor?
A: Unlike a specific site that is significant for its natural or cultural heritage, a Heritage Corridor is an entire region that is federally designated as nationally significant for its cultural and natural heritage.

Q: How big is the Corridor?
A: The Erie Canal was originally 363 miles long. The present Corridor incorporates additional canalways, and measures 524 miles in length.

Q: How do I get there?
A: There are many ways to visit the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor. More information on getting there can be found on our "Plan Your Visit" page.

Q: I like to boat. What opportunities are there for boating on the Canal?
A: Many areas along the Corridor offer opportunities for boating. More information on boating the Canalway can be found on the New York State Canal Corporation website.

Q: The Canalway sounds like a great place to bicycle. Can I do that there?
A: Bicycling is a popular way to explore and enjoy the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor. You can find more information on bicycling opportunities on the official Corridor website and on the Parks & Trails New York website.

Q: Why are there two Websites for information on the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor?
A: The Corridor contains a wide range of natural, historical and cultural sites that are owned, managed, or operated by local municipalities, State agencies, or Federal entities. The official Erie Canalway website, run by the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor Commission, offers the most effective way to create a unified Web presence for the entire Corridor. As a major contributor of professional assistance, the National Park Service also has a Website for the Canalway --which you are viewing presently.

Did You Know?

An 1890s image of a family on a canal boat in Rochester, New York.

Rochester, NY was America’s first inland boom town. The stone aqueduct carried the enlarged Erie Canal over the Genesee River. It now supports the Broad Street bridge.