• Mission San Jose

    El Camino Real de los Tejas

    National Historic Trail TX,LA

Unveiling the First Road Signs along El Camino Real de los Tejas at Apache Pass

Apache Pass river crossing
Apache Pass river crossing

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
News Release Date: September 19, 2012
Contact: Steve Gonzales, 512-850-9073
Contact: Dr. Lucile Estell, 512-446-5372

Hit the Trail! Join us at Apache Pass for the unveiling of the first ever official National Park Service signs along El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail on Monday, October 8, 2012 at 10:00 AM. The event will feature a formal unveiling of the signs by US Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison. 

Apache Pass is located at 9112 North FM 908, Rockdale Texas 76567. 

From the east:  Take US Highway 79 into downtown Rockdale and turn left on FM 908. Follow FM 908 for 8 miles and you will see the entrance to Apache Pass on your right-hand side.  

From the west: Take US Highway 79 into Thorndale and turn left onto FM 486 at the red traffic light in Thorndale. Follow FM 486 until you get to FM 908. Turn right on FM 908. Continue straight on FM 908 and you will see Apache Pass on your left-hand side.

Event Schedule, Monday, October 8, 2012, 10:00 AM:

  • 10:00 a.m. Welcome, Opening Remarks, Presentation of Colors, and Pledge of Allegiance
  • 10:10 a.m. Presentation by Aaron Mahr, Superintendent, El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail, and Dr. Terry Colley, Deputy Executive Director, Texas Historical Commission
  • 10:30 a.m. Presentation by U S Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison
  • 11:00 a.m. Recognition of US Senator Hutchison's efforts for El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail
  • 11:05 a.m. Closing Remarks by Milam County Judge Dave Barkemeyer 

El Camino Real de los Tejas connected a series of Spanish missions and posts, from the Río Grande to Los Adaes (first capital of the Texas province), now in northwestern Louisiana. Centuries before the arrival of Spanish explorers, American Indians developed trade routes that linked native communities across hundreds of miles. Beginning in the 1680s, development of the road by the Spanish drastically changed native cultures by making them part of a broader exchange of new ideas and technologies, and exposing them to Old World diseases to which they had little resistance. Congress designated El Camino Real de los Tejas as a national historic trail in 2004 as part of the National Trails System. 

El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail works with partners to protect, develop, and promote the trail for public use and benefit. Learn more at www.nps.gov/elte

More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America's 395 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov

Did You Know?

Daughters of the American Revolution granite marker sits on El Camino Real de los Tejas

El Camino Real de los Tejas and the Old San Antonio Road, now a national historic trail, served as an avenue for continuity and change, bringing cultural innovations into Texas from the north, as it had earlier brought Spanish-Mexican institutions from the south.