• Mission San Jose

    El Camino Real de los Tejas

    National Historic Trail TX,LA

Certified Sites on El Camino Real de los Tejas NHT

The owners and managers of these historic sites and interpretive centers are certified partners with the National Park Service on El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail.

(updated May 20, 2014)

 

LOUISIANA

Fort Jesup: 32 Geoghagan Road, six miles northeast of Many, just south of State Highway 6

Fort St. Jean Baptiste: 155 Jefferson Street in Natchitoches (between Keyser Street and University Parkway)

Los Adaes State Historic Site: 6354 State Highway 485, one mile northeast of Robeline

TEXAS

Apache Pass: 9112 North Farm-to-Market Road 908, eight miles northwest of Rockdale

Bastrop State Park: 3005 Texas Highway 21, Bastrop

Caddo Mounds State Historic Site Trail Remnants: 1649 State Highway 21 west, six miles southwest of Alto

McKinney Falls State Park: 5808 McKinney Falls Parkway, six miles south/southeast of downtown Austin

Mission Tejas State Park: 120 State Park Road 44, 16 miles east/northeast of Grapeland and just north of State Highway 21

Nuestro Señora del Espíritu Santo de Zuñiga Mission (Mission Espíritu Santo): 108 Park Road 6, just west of US highways 77 and 183 and State Highway 239, ¾ mile south of Goliad

Cabeza Creek Crossing: five miles west of Goliad

Nuestro Señora de Rosario Mission (Mission Rosario): four miles west of Goliad, just southwest of where US Highway 59 crosses the San Antonio River

Republic of the Rio Grande Museum: 1005 Zaragoza Street (near San Agustin Avenue), Laredo

Treviño-Uribe Rancho: at the corner of Treviño and Uribe streets, San Ygnacio

Villa Antigua Border Heritage Museum: 810 Zaragoza Street (near Santa Ursula Avenue), Laredo

Durst-Taylor House: 304 North Street (north of Hospital Street), Nacogdoches

Did You Know?

Daughters of the American Revolution granite marker sits on El Camino Real de los Tejas

El Camino Real de los Tejas and the Old San Antonio Road, now a national historic trail, served as an avenue for continuity and change, bringing cultural innovations into Texas from the north, as it had earlier brought Spanish-Mexican institutions from the south.