• Historic inscriptions carved in the bluff at El Morro.

    El Morro

    National Monument New Mexico

Your Safety

Hiking Safety
There are a number of things you can do to make your hike safer. Consult a ranger for assistance in choosing a trail to meet your abilities. Carry plenty of water, (at least 20 ounces, more on warm days). Wear sturdy hiking shoes, and dress for variable weather. Stay on designated trails, for your protection and to prevent damage to the fragile resources.

Weather
During summer months, storms can arise quickly. Watch for building thunderstorms in the afternoon, and in the event of lightning, take cover. Avoid hilltops, ridges, and flat open areas.

To minimize the threat posed by afternoon thunderstorms, it is best to begin day hikes to higher elevations at El Morro early in the morning to allow ample time to be down from exposed heights before the onset of storm activity.

Wildlife
Two species of rattlesnakes live at El Morro. Never place your hands or feet where you cannot see. Rattlesnakes or black widow spiders may be sheltered there.

Mountain Lions also live in the area and are known to occasionally roam the park. Encounters are rare, but possible. To prevent an encounter - Do not hike or jog alone; keep children within site and close by; and keep a clean camp or picnic site. Most lions avoid confrontation, so give the lion a way to escape. Stay calm and speak loudly and firmly. DO NOT RUN from a mountain lion, rather stand and face it. Make eye contact. Appear as large as you can. Raise your arms, open your jacket, or lift your day pack over your head. Throw stones or whatever you can reach without crouching or turning your back. Try to remain standing and face the animal. Report any mountain lion sightings to a Ranger.



Report a Hazard
To report a hazard, please contact: e-mail us

Did You Know?