• Two-wheeled carretas carried goods up El Camino from Mexico City in 1598; walking the trail in the Jornada del Muerto, a scorching 90-mile stretch of El Camino wherein colonists had to leave the cool Rio Grande to continue their journey north

    El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro

    National Historic Trail NM,TX

Bibliography

March 8, 2011

Emory, Lt. Col. William Hensley, 1848, Notes of a Military Reconnaissance from Fort Leavenworth in Missouri, to San Diego, California, including part of the Arkansas, Del Norte, and Gila Rivers. Senate Document No. 7, 30th Congress, 1st Session, Ex. Doc. No. 41, Washington, D.C.

Hammond, George Peter and Agapito Rey, Editors. 1953 Don Juan de Oñate, Colonizer of New Mexico, 1595-1628. Coronado Cuarto Centennial Publications, 1540-1940, Vols. v and vi. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press.

_____________. The Rediscovery of New Mexico, 1580-1594: The Explorations of Chamuscado, Espejo, Castaño de Sosa, Morlete, and Leyva de Bonilla and Humaña. Coronado Cuarto Centennial Publications, 1540-1940, Vol. III. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico Press, 1966.

Moorhead, Max L. New Mexico’s Royal Road: Trade and Travel on the Chihuahua Trail. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 1958.

Palmer, Gabrielle G., Comp., June-el Piper and LouAnn Jacobson, Eds., 1993/1999, El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, (Vols 1&2). Santa Fe: Bureau of Land management, Cultural Resources Series Nos. 11 and 13.

Pacheco, José De La Cruz and Sánchez, Joseph P, Coordinators. "Memorias del Coloquio Internatcional El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro." Instituto Nacional de Antropología e Historia (Mexico D.F.), 2000.

Sando, Joe S. Pueblo Nations: Eight Centuries of Pueblo Indian History. Santa Fe: Clear Light Publishers, 1992.

Simmons, Marc. The Last Conquistador: Juan de Oñate and the Settling of the Far Southwest. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1991.

Did You Know?

Traces of a dirt road, El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro, stretch across a southern New Mexico desert landscape

Supply caravans traversing the 1,500 mile El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro linking Mexico City and Santa Fe provided communication and supply for the province of New Mexico during the 17th century. The trips occurred every three or four years and took six months each way.