• Camarasus skull in the cliff face, rafters on the Green River, McKee Springs petroglyphs

    Dinosaur

    National Monument CO,UT

Ely Creek Backcountry Campsites in Dinosaur National Monument Closed Due to Black Bear Activity

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Date: May 16, 2013
Contact: Mary Risser, (870) 374-3001
Contact: Dan Johnson, (435) 781-7702

Dinosaur, CO - Superintendent Mary Risser announced today that the two backcountry campsites at Ely Creek, located along the Jones Hole Trail, are closed until further notice due to black bear activity in the area. "In an effort to reduce interactions between people and the bear and to reduce the possibility that the bear will get and become habituated to human food, we have decided to close the campground at least temporarily." stated Superintendent Risser.   

"We have had numerous sightings reported to park staff over the past few weeks," continued Risser. "The bear seem to be residing in the area. Park staff will not take reservations for the campsites and any existing reservations are cancelled.  We are stepping up our public education program, and the Jones Hole Trail remains open at this time. The trail is very popular with fisherman and day hikers. The Jones Hole river campsites also remain open, but these sites are reserved for river rafting groups until the middle of September." 

Visitors to the popular Jones Hole Trail are advised to be on the lookout for black bears. Although visitors to Dinosaur National Monument may not think of the monument as "bear country," frequent sightings confirm black bears do live here. Hikers are encouraged to be alert for their presence and report bear sightings as soon as possible at a visitor center or ranger station. Park visitors are reminded to store food, garbage, camp coolers, and other items that can attract bears in bear-proof storage boxes or hang any items in a bag from a tree. This helps keep bears from becoming conditioned to human foods and helps keep park visitors and their property safe. Should you encounter a bear, never approach it. You should leave the area immediately.

Did You Know?

Photo of paleontologist Earl Douglass.

Paleontologist Earl Douglass first came to Utah looking for mammal fossils. He returned in 1909 and discovered an immense deposit of dinosaur bones, now protected at Dinosaur National Monument. Although made famous by dinosaurs, Douglass died preferring his beloved mammal fossils over dinosaurs.