• Camarasus skull in the cliff face, rafters on the Green River, McKee Springs petroglyphs

    Dinosaur

    National Monument CO,UT

Invasive Plant Management

Documents related to Management of Invasive Plants in Dinosaur National Monument

Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for Invasive Plant Management Plan
This represents National Park Service approval that the Monument's approach to invasive plant management, as outlined in the plan, should have no significant negative impact on park resources.

Invasive Plant Management Plan and Environmental Assessment
This is the complete analysis of the Monument's plan to control invasive, non-native plants that threaten the park's natural and cultural resources.

 
 

Dinosaur National Monument Northern Tamarisk Beetle (Diorhabda carinulata) Biological Control Project (Adobe pdf 3.5 MB)
The northern tamarisk beetle (Diorhabda carinulata) was released at several locations along the Green River in Dinosaur National Monument during 2006 and 2007, for biological control of invasive exotic tamarisk (Tamarix spp.), also known as "saltcedar." This report documents observations of beetle activity made prior to the initiation of the monument-wide monitoring program, as well as the results gathered by the formal monitoring program during 2008–2010.

Did You Know?

Picture of lizard resting on a rock.

Dinosaurs became extinct 65 million years ago, but lizards are still a common sight at Dinosaur National Monument. The small, inquisitive reptiles have endured on Earth for more than 300 million years, far outlasting their giant cousins.