• Camarasus skull in the cliff face, rafters on the Green River, McKee Springs petroglyphs

    Dinosaur

    National Monument CO,UT

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    The Ely Creek backcountry campsites located along the Jones Hole Trail are closed until at least May 1, 2014 due to bear activity. More »

Fire Management

Smoke billowing high into the sky from a fire adjacent to the monument
The Mellen Fire, a lightning started fire, burned over 3000 acres on lands near the headquarters of Dinosaur National Monument in 2009.
NPS Image
 

The National Park Service works to understand, maintain, restore, and protect the inherent integrity of the natural resources, processes, and values of the local ecosystem while providing meaningful and appropriate opportunities for the public to enjoy them. Inherent in this mission is management of fire on the landscape.

The Fire Management Program at Dinosaur National Monument manages wildfire and prescribed fire to maintain a natural vegetation mosaic while also protecting important natural, cultural, and paleontological resources. Wildfire management ranges from suppression to allowing it to burn for natural resource benefits. Fire operations are based on the Colorado side of the Monument, which experiences the majority of the fire activity.

 

Because Dinosaur National Monument is situated in both Colorado and Utah, the Fire Management Program works closely with the Uintah Basin Fire Center in Vernal, UT and works cooperatively with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the Forest Service (FS), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), and the State of Utah on an interagency basis.

In addition, Dinosaur assists a cluster of smaller parks on the Colorado Plateau in managing fire. These parks include Colorado National Monument, Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, and Curecanti National Recreation Area. The Dinosaur Fire Office provides them with some fire management oversight including prescribed fire, administrative support, and material resources.

Did You Know?

Peregrine chicks on cliff.

A population of peregrine falcons has been established at Dinosaur National Monument. The park's rugged canyons make ideal habitat for the once endangered raptor. Fossils show that dinosaurs evolved into birds--and so still live in modified form at Dinosaur.