• Fulmer Falls at George W. Childs Park

    Delaware Water Gap

    National Recreation Area NJ,PA

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  • Hornbecks Creek Trail Partial Closure

    The trail is closed between the first and second waterfall; a portion of the trail has sloughed off, causing a hazardous condition. The first waterfall is accessible from the 209 trailhead and the second waterfall is accessible from Emory Road.

  • River Road Closure

    Starting on Monday, September 8, River Road will be closed from Park Headquarters to Smithfield Beach while contractors complete pavement repairs. Access to Smithfield Beach will still be possible. More »

Boat

A boat rounding a curve in a river
Upstream through the Gap
 

The Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area includes nearly 40 miles of the free-flowing Delaware River. Powerboats must have a valid state registration.

River Acces (Boat & Canoe)

Restricted Areas.
Within the Smithfield/Coppermine Pool, you may not operate a machine-powered vessel:within the designated swimming area, as delineated by regulatory buoys

  • in excess of 5-mph or creating a wake within 500 feet upstream or downstream of the designated swimming area, as delineated by regulatory buoys
  • within the designated canoe channel, as delineated by regulatory buoys,

Within the Milford Beach pool you may not operate a machine-powered vessel:

  • within the designated swimming area as delineated by regulatory buoys

Camping is limited to boaters on authorized overnight trips.

Personal water craft and waterskiing are prohibited in the park.

It is unlawful to operate a vessel while intoxicated.

Seasonal speed limits
From April 1 through September, 30:
10 mph speed limit
From October 1 through 31 March 31: 35 mph speed limit

Water Safety

Did You Know?

Sketch of a shiny, silvery, oval shaped fish with smallish fins

... that shad have made a comeback in the Delaware River, due to pollution control. This member of the herring family lives its adult life in the ocean, but travels up rivers and streams to spawn. Each spring, anglers follow the "shad run" up the Delaware River to catch these hard-fighting fish. More...