• America's First

    Devils Tower

    National Monument Wyoming

Devils Tower to Waive Entrance Fees for Veterans Day Weekend

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Date: October 31, 2013
Contact: Nancy Stimson, 307 467 5283

Devils Tower, WY - Devils Tower National Monument will be joining national park units across the country in celebrating Veterans Day with free entry into the monument.  The fee free designation will apply to the entire Veteran's Day weekend, Saturday, Sunday and Monday, November 9 – 11.

 Americans are invited to enjoy this great land they've protected. In recognition of current and former servicemen and women, Devils Tower NM and all national parks will wave entrance fees throughout Veteran's Day weekend. "From everyone in the National Park Service, I extend gratitude to all who have served in the U.S. armed forces and defended the people, freedoms, and resources of this country," said NPS Director, John Jarvis. "In honor of veterans, entry to the national parks, which preserve many of our nation's finest natural and cultural resources, will be free. I invite everyone to take advantage of this opportunity and savor places that our veterans have kept safe for us."    

A free interagency Military Pass is available at the entrance station.  An active duty US military ID (CAC Card or DoD Form 1173) is required. The Military Pass allows unlimited entry to federal recreation sites for active duty military personnel and dependents for one year. Proper identification is required. This pass is available to US military members and their dependents in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines and Coast Guard, as well as most members of the US Reserves and National Guard. It must be obtained in person at Federal recreation sites that charge entrance or standard amenity fees. The pass covers entrance to Fish and Wildlife Service and National Park Service sites that charge entrance fees, and Standard Amenity Fees at Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management and Bureau of Reclamation sites. It admits the owner of the pass and any accompanying passengers in a private non-commercial vehicle at vehicle fee areas, or the pass owner and up to three (3) additional adults at sites that charge per person. No entry fee is charged for children 15 and under. The Military Pass is non-transferable.

 The Interagency Access Pass is also available at the entrance station. This is a lifetime pass for U.S. citizens or permanent residents with permanent disabilities. Documentation is required to obtain the pass. Acceptable documentation includes: statement by a licensed physician; document issued by Federal agency such as the Veteran's Administration, Social Security Disability Income or Supplemental Security Income; or document issued by a State agency such as a vocational rehabilitation agency. The pass provides access to, and use of, Federal recreation sites that charge an Entrance or Standard Amenity. The pass admits the pass holder and passengers in a non-commercial vehicle at vehicle fee areas and pass holder + 3 adults.  The pass can only be obtained in person at the park and is non-transferable.

 The national parks hold something for everyone—hikers and campers and people who like to explore history, take a leisurely nature walk, or simply pack a picnic lunch and get away from it all. In the parks, visitors of all abilities and interests can enjoy a holiday, often without making more than a short trip from one of the nearby population centers many of us call home.

For more on national park fee free days, go to www.nps.gov/findapark/feefreeparks.htm.

 To learn more about Devils Tower National Monument contact a park ranger at 307-467-5283, visit us online at www.nps.gov/deto or on Facebook at Devils-Tower-National-Monument-Official-NPS-Site. Devils Tower National Monument is located, 33 miles northeast of Moorcroft, WY, 27 miles northwest of Sundance, WY via U.S. 14, 9 Miles south of Hulett via WY24, and 52 miles southwest of Belle Fourche, S.D. via S.D. Highway34/WY24.

www.nps.gov

Did You Know?

Ponderosa pine tree where porcupine has eaten bark

Porcupines spend a good deal of their lives stripping off the outer bark of trees to expose and eat the cambian layer. You can see many examples of this at Devils Tower when you walk along the Tower Trail.