• pond surrounded by green brush, reflecting a distant range of snow-covered mountains that are dominated by one massive mountain

    Denali

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Things to Know Before You Come

a bus stopped on a dirt road, a green hill and caribou to the side
Using a bus, visitors ride higher than in a normal car - letting you see over brush. Many eyes make for more frequent wildlife sightings, too.
 
Traveling the Denali Park Road

Denali National Park and Preserve has one road, simply called the Denali Park Road, and it is the main avenue for visitors to see and experience Denali.

The road is 92 miles long, and only the first 15 miles of it are paved. That paved portion, leading from the park entrance to Savage River, is open during the summer for public (non-commercial) vehicles to drive. Summer travel beyond mile 15, which is hugely recommended, is by shuttle or tour bus, or under human power. The summer season in Denali runs from late May through early September. Please note that some children will require car seats on the park buses.

Learn more about:

 

Be Prepared

Visiting a national park in Alaska can be quite different from a trip to parks in the lower-48. It is important to prepare for weather and wildlife, and to be flexible as you spend time in this extremely rural state.

  • Travel Green - Get tips on making your vacation a sustainable journey.
  • Stay Safe - With limited cell coverage, read up on how to stay safe in remote areas and in the chance of a wildlife encounter.
  • Weather - With snow possible any month of the year, be prepared for a wide range of conditions.
  • Pets - Pets are welcome in Denali, but be sure to read up on where they may and may not go.
  • Small Aircraft Information - If you are flying your own plane to the park, find all the resources needed to make it here safely.
  • Goods & Services - Get a sense of where you can buy camping supplies and food in this rural area.


Did You Know?

scenic image of a green plain bisected by a thin river, mountains and clouds in the distance

Cold temperatures limit trees from growing at high elevation in Denali. Warmer temperatures, however, have led to woody vegetation growing at ever-higher elevations. Treeline changes are a conspicuous sign of climate change.