• pond surrounded by green brush, reflecting a distant range of snow-covered mountains that are dominated by one massive mountain

    Denali

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

There are park alerts in effect.
hide Alerts »
  • Road Open To: Mile 3 (Park Headquarters)

    The Park Road is currently open to Mile 3, Park Headquarters. Wintry conditions beyond that point prevent vehicle travel, though pedestrian travel is permitted. More »

Recent Weather Conditions and Current Climbing Activity

Prayer flags at the 14,200-foot camp
(NPS Photo - Coley Gentzel)
 

The 2014 mountaineering season on Denali is now over, with the last of the climbing teams safely off the mountain. Below are the 2014 registration statistics and reported summit rates, with numbers subject to change slightly in upcoming weeks as our registration staff fine tunes the database. The Denali Weather Observations spreadsheet shows daily sky conditions, temperatures, wind speeds, and new precipitation observed throughout the 2014 season.

Climbing Statistics for the 2014 season

Mt. McKinley

Mt. Foraker

Number of Registered Climbers

1,204

12

Climbers Currently On Mountain

0

0

Completed Climbs

1,204

12

Number of Summits

429

6

Summit Percentage

36%

50%

 
The Walter Harper Talkeetna Ranger Station registration staff also maintains a 24-hour mountaineering statistics line at (907)733-9127. During the spring season, the voice recording is updated daily with the number of registered climbers, the number of climbers currently on the mountain, and the total recorded summits for both Mt. McKinley and Mt. Foraker.
 

Other Mountaineering Statistics
For season-by-season mountaineering statistics such as summit attempts by route, nationalities, average age, percentage of women climbers, busiest summit days, and other interesting data, go to our annual mountaineering summaries.

Annual number of climbers on Mt. McKinley, 1903 to 2013

Historical timeline of important climbing 'firsts' and interesting ascents

Mountain Weather Observations

Did You Know?

scenic image of a green plain bisected by a thin river, mountains and clouds in the distance

Cold temperatures limit trees from growing at high elevation in Denali. Warmer temperatures, however, have led to woody vegetation growing at ever-higher elevations. Treeline changes are a conspicuous sign of climate change.