• pond surrounded by green brush, reflecting a distant range of snow-covered mountains that are dominated by one massive mountain

    Denali

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

No Breakthroughs in Search for Missing Climber

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Date: May 25, 2009
Contact: Maureen McLaughlin, (907) 733-9103
Contact: Kris Fister, (907) 683-9583

After five days of aerial and ground searching on Mt. McKinley, there has still been no sighting of Dr. Gerald Myers, nor any evidence of a fall or disturbance on the snow surface.  On Monday, May 25, two teams of NPS ground crews, one out of the 14,200-foot camp and the other from the 17,200-foot camp, searched near the base of the Messner Couloir and along the ridge above Denali Pass, respectively, but neither team found any clues to Dr. Myers whereabouts.  The U.S. Army Chinook helicopters flew early Monday morning, but wind instability at higher elevations turned them back to Talkeetna.  As the winds calmed late in the day, the park’s A-Star B3 helicopter was able to fly the search zone and collect photographs in evening light conditions.  Back at the Talkeetna Ranger Station, staff continues to comb through thousands of high resolution images in hopes of detecting clues.

Tonight, National Park Service search managers will assess the flight and photo data collected throughout the week and determine whether any additional areas warrant more coverage.

Did You Know?

a two-story wood building

The visitor center at Denali National Park and Preserve received an award for its environmentally friendly design. Some of the center features are built with renewable and recycled materials, as well as locally found materials.