• pond surrounded by green brush, reflecting a distant range of snow-covered mountains that are dominated by one massive mountain

    Denali

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Moving River Fire in Denali Increases in Size

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Date: June 24, 2013
Contact: Kris Fister, (907) 683-9583

DENALI PARK, Alaska: After burning slowly since its discovery on June 22, the fire behavior of the Moving River Fire increased significantly on Sunday evening, June 23, growing from 5 acres to 700 acres. The fire was 100% active, with torching behavior (burning of the entire tree) observed. It is burning 29 miles northwest of Kantishna on the south side of the Kantishna River in a mixed spruce forest. A crew of eight smokejumpers (BLM and USFS) was deployed Sunday evening to initiate structure protection on the historic Roosevelt cabin and its associated outbuildings. Preparations are almost in place to do a burnout operation, i.e. burn vegetation from around the site, to create a buffer around the cabin.

The Bear Creek Fire, which late yesterday was estimated to be approximately 60 acres in size, is located fifteen miles northwest of Kantishna and three miles west of Moose Creek.It is burning in an area that burned in 1993, and was 60 percent active and moving slowly in black spruce.

Current forecasts indicate the area's weather will be hot and dry this week. Because of the significant fire danger, the National Park Service is urging park visitors to be extra cautious with anything that could start a wildfire. Fires are not allowed in the park's wilderness areas and fireworks are prohibited. Everyone has a hand in a safe wildfire season.

Currently there are more than 84 active wildfires in the state. Where there is fire, there is smoke. Due to the current and expected statewide fire activity, anticipate the possibility of varying levels of smoke. Keep informed of local fire information and air quality reports. Wildfire smoke information is available at http://www.dec.state.ak.us.air/smokemain.htm. Visit http://fire.ak.blm.gov for statewide information and a map of the active fires.

Visit http://www.nps.gov/dena/parkmgmt/currentfireinfo.htmfor current fire information, a map and a link to photos.

Did You Know?

a lake reflecting a tree-covered hill

The vast landscapes of interior Alaska are changing. Large glaciers are receding, permafrost is melting and woody plants are spreading. Comparison of "then-and-now" photographs and data from major vegetation monitoring should allow detection, understanding and potential management of these changes.