• pond surrounded by green brush, reflecting a distant range of snow-covered mountains that are dominated by one massive mountain

    Denali

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

National Park Service Advises Wildland Fire Prevention Over Fourth of July Holiday

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Date: July 1, 2008
Contact: Larry Weddle, (907) 683-6241

Denali National Park and Preserve officials are asking visitors to be especially cautious with fire over the upcoming holiday period. Campfires are permitted in the fire grates in some of the park’s campgrounds but please ensure that campfires are completely extinguished after use.

 

Fireworks are not allowed in Denali National Park and Preserve and will be confiscated. Persons using fireworks in the park may be prosecuted. 

 

So far this year, about 90% of the wildland fires in Alaska have been caused by people. Although the fire season in Alaska has not been severe this year, wildland fuels such as grass, brush and trees can dry out quickly. If ignited, dry fuels can quickly grow into large fires.

 

Additional park information can be obtained in person at the Denali Visitor Center between 8:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m..  Visitors can also call (907) 683-2294 between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. daily or visit the park website at www.nps.gov/dena.

Did You Know?

close view of bearberry, a small red-colored plant

In 1908, Charles Sheldon – a hunter and naturalist – described in his journal the idea of a park that would allow visitors to enjoy the beauty he saw while visiting Alaska. In 1917 his vision became reality, with the creation of Mount McKinley National Park.