• pond surrounded by green brush, reflecting a distant range of snow-covered mountains that are dominated by one massive mountain

    Denali

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Investigation Concluded on Airplane Crash Site

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Date: October 16, 2009
Contact: Kris Fister, 907-683-9583

National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) personnel arrived in Denali National Park mid-day today, and have concluded their on-scene investigation of the crash site above the East Fork of the Toklat River in Denali National Park and Preserve. The remains of Gordon Haber, 67, of Denali Park, have been removed from the aircraft wreckage and will be released to the Office of the State Medical Examiner. All personnel, National Park Service and NTSB, will be airlifted off the site by nightfall. Park rangers are developing a plan to remove the plane wreckage.

Pilot Dan McGregor, 35, of Denali Park is at the Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, undergoing treatment for burns. McGregor not only survived the crash, but walked approximately 20 miles from the crash site to the Igloo Creek Campground, where he encountered two campers from New Hampshire late Thursday night. Nicholas Rodrick and Jesse Hoagland walked four miles with McGregor to the Teklanika River Rest Area, where their car was parked, and drove him to his home just outside the park boundary. They returned to the campground today to retrieve their camping equipment.

No additional information about the accident will be available until the NTSB has completed their investigation.

-NPS-

Did You Know?

an arctic ground squirrel on its hind legs

Nearly 500 vegetation plots have been installed in Denali, to monitor climate change. Warmer temperatures allow woody plants to grow at higher elevations, invading the fragile and unique plants already in high alpine tundra - and threatening the animals that depend on those specialized plants.