• pond surrounded by green brush, reflecting a distant range of snow-covered mountains that are dominated by one massive mountain

    Denali

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

National Park Service Issues FONSI for Horseshoe Lake Trail

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Date: February 27, 2014
Contact: Maureen Gualtieri, (907) 733-9103

DENALI PARK, Alaska: The National Park Service (NPS) announces the availability of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Horseshoe Lake Trail Additions and Improvements Environmental Assessment. The NPS chose the action alternative to extend the Horseshoe Lake Trail around the lake and along the Nenana River. Improvements to the trail will include the construction of one bridge and two short sections of boardwalk. The existing planks leading to the peninsula area at the lake will be removed and signs will be used to deter traffic from the peninsula to prevent further impacts to wildlife and the large active beaver lodge located adjacent to it. The NPS will create a trail to an overlook on the ridge south of the lake by utilizing an existing social trail. Other social trails will be revegetated and signed to encourage visitors to remain on the maintained trail.

The additions and improvements are needed as the popular trail, which provides opportunities for visitors to see moose, beaver, and many bird species, is severely degraded. A network of social trails has developed around the lake and throughout the area, creating additional erosion and damage to sensitive wildlife habitat, including beaver dams and lodges.

The FONSI is available for review online at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/horseshoelake.

For additional information about the EA or FONSI, contact Paula Homan, Project Planning Lead, at (907) 683-6223 or via email at Paula_Homan@nps.gov.

Stay connected with "DenaliNPS" on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, and iTunes – links to these social media sites are available at www.nps.gov/dena.

www.nps.gov

Did You Know?

snowy landscape and distant snow-covered mountain

Recent climate warming has affected Denali in ways that are readily apparent, such as reduced spring snowfall, earlier snowmelt, earlier green-up and thawing of permanent snowfields. Subarctic ecosystems, like Denali, are extremely sensitive to climate variability and change.