• pond surrounded by green brush, reflecting a distant range of snow-covered mountains that are dominated by one massive mountain

    Denali

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Denali Park to Burn Debris Piles Near Remote Cabins and Buildings

Subscribe RSS Icon | What is RSS
Date: August 29, 2007
Contact: Kris Fister, 907-683-9583

Denali National Park and Preserve fire management staff will burn several piles of woody debris in remote areas of the park beginning Tuesday, September 4 through Friday, September 7, weather and other conditions permitting. The piles are situated near these isolated cabins and buildings: the Stampede Mine site and the Lower East Fork, Lower Toklat and Sushana patrol cabins located along the original Mt. McKinley National Park northern boundary.

The materials to be burned are the tree branches and brush cleared from the vicinity of the remote buildings as a result of the hazard fuel treatment program taking place to reduce the threat poised to these facilities in the event of a wildfire. The cabins are all listed on the National Register of Historic Places due to role they played in supporting ranger patrols and the enforcement of wildlife conservation in the early years of the park’s history. The Stampede Mine is a Historic District consisting of nine buildings and other structures. The district is significant because it retains all of the elements of a mid-20th century mining operation in a remote location.

The burn piles range in size, each containing four to sixteen cubic yards of material and are located in open areas away from the structures. Two to four fire management staff will be at each site to monitor the burn piles and the weather to insure that these historic buildings are not threatened. It is anticipated that the piles will take two-three days to burn.

For additional information call park headquarters at (907) 683-2294 from 8:00 a.m.-4:30 p.m. daily.

-NPS-

Did You Know?

scenic view from a mountainside, overlooking a wide gravel plain and distant mountains

Small amounts of airborne pollutants from around the world arrive in Denali every year. Remoteness alone cannot protect the park's clean air. As global human population grows, it is likely that increasing global emissions will affect Denali's air quality.