• pond surrounded by green brush, reflecting a distant range of snow-covered mountains that are dominated by one massive mountain

    Denali

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Harvest of Timber, Plants, and Berries

Subsistence harvest and collection of live, standing timber, greater than 3 inches in diameter, in the ANILCA additions to the park and preserve is allowed under a permit issued by the Superintendent. House logs and fir wood may be obtained only for use in a private residence of a subsistence user or subsistence cabin. No commercial use of timber harvested or collected in the park is allowed. Learn more about cabin construction and use.

Collection and use of dead or down wood for personal use is allowed and no permit is required. The wood may be used in campfires, home stoves and fire places for cooking and warming. The wood may only be collected in the ANILCA park and preserve additions.

Live timber, less than 3 inches in diameter, may be harvested without a permit. Such wood is often used for smoking fish, constructing drying racks for meat and fish and for handicrafts, such as snowshoes and sleds.

Gathering of fruit, berries, mushrooms and other plant materials for subsistence uses is allowed in the ANILCA additions to the Park and in the Preserve. No permit is required.

Did You Know?

a green hillside and a brown scar denoting where a landslide occurred

Warmer temperatures have led to dramatic thawing of permafrost. Thaw releases carbon, as once-frozen materials decompose, but allows increased plant growth. Researchers in Denali are studying whether thawing permafrost will increase or decrease world-wide carbon emissions.