• pond surrounded by green brush, reflecting a distant range of snow-covered mountains that are dominated by one massive mountain

    Denali

    National Park & Preserve Alaska

Additional Educational Resources

While not exactly curricula or lesson plans, these resources can still be valuable in helping your students learn about Denali.

 
beaver swimming in a lake

Fact Sheets

Before visiting Denali with your class or studying the subarctic, help your students to become Denali subject experts. Have each student read a fact sheet and report the highlights to the rest of the class. The tapestry of knowledge that they gain from this exercise will help make their experience here, or their understanding of your class project, far richer.


Check out our fact sheets, ranging from topics as specific as the moose rut to as general as river and stream ecology.
 

A Slideshow on the Science of Sled Dogs


In this short slide show, students get to know the sled dogs of Denali. Sled dogs and rangers work together to preserve and protect your park. The far north is a land of extreme cold. The adaptations of sled dogs help us understand how animals survive and thrive in the subarctic.

Additional Resources

Learn more about the park sled dog kennels and - in summer - check out the puppy webcam

Also consider connecting remotely with a ranger for our Science of Sled Dogs distance learning program. The program involves an hour-long conversation via Skype, as well as pre- and post-Skype activities.

 

Park Education Packet

Our education packet is not an established curricula, per se, but instead is an overview of a variety of topics. Included in the packet is information about:

  • Wildlife
  • Mountaineering history
  • Geology
  • Vegetation
  • Park history
  • Climate

There is also a vocabulary list and links to additional information.

Additional Resources

To better understand the geography of the park, consider checking out our landscape panoramas and webcams.

Did You Know?

Image of fossilized, three-toed dinosaur print

In the summer of 2005 a footprint of a dinosaur was found in Denali National Park. The print has been identified as belonging to a three toed foot of a Cretaceous Theropod.