• !5-inch Rodman Cannon

    Civil War Defenses of Washington

    District of Columbia

Laws & Policies

Firearms

As of February 22, 2010, a new federal law makes possession of firearms in national parks subject to local and state firearms laws.

It is the responsibility of visitors to understand and comply with all applicable state, local, and federal firearms laws before entering this park. As a starting point, please visit our state’s website.

For the sites within the District of Columbia:

District of Columbia Law

See Division I, Title 7, Subtitle J, Chapter 25

See also Division IV, Title 22, Subtitle VI, Chapter 45

District of Columbia Attorney General

For the sites within the State of Maryland:

Maryland State Law

See Maryland Code, Public Safety, Title 5

See also Maryland Code, Criminal Law, Title 4

Maryland Attorney General

For the sites within the State of Virginia:

Virginia Law

See sections 18.2-279 through 18.2-312

Virginia Attorney General

Federal law continues to prohibit firearms in federal facilities in this park. Those federal facilities are marked with signs at public entrances.

Did You Know?

Isaac Ingalls Stevens

Built in 1861, Fort Stevens originally was named Fort Massachusetts. The fort was renamed Fort Stevens in 1863 after Isaac Ingalls Stevens. Stevens was the governor of the Washington Territory.