• !5-inch Rodman Cannon

    Civil War Defenses of Washington

    District of Columbia

Management

The National Park Service Civil War Defenses of Washington sites are under the management of three seperate units--National Capital Parks-East, Rock Creek Park, and George Washington Memorial Parkway. Because the management of these sites is divided among three parks, a Final Managment Plan was developed in 2004 to provide a unified management concept for the significant cultural and natural resources associated with the Civil War Defenses of Washington. This plan will guide the management of the parks over the next 10-15 years. The Final Management Plan is presented here in two parts for those who would like to learn more:

Final Management Plan - Part 1

Final Management Plan - Part 2

Civil War Defenses of Washington Trail

Learn more about the history of the linear parklands connecting the Civil War fort sites. Immediately following the end of the Civil War, a scenic parkway was proposed to connect the forts and to preserve them. In 1902 the McMillan Commission supported this vision and in the 1930s the National Park Service began to acquire the land for Fort Drive. Small sections were built, but the vast majority was not. The legacy of this vision is a necklace of linear parkland surrounding Washington, D.C. today envisoned as trail network.

Check out the new CWDW Trail Brochure to learn more.

Did You Know?

Rodman cannon at Fort Foote

The 15-inch Rodman cannon at Fort Foote in Prince George's County, Maryland, weighs about 50,000 lbs (25 tons).