• Photo of the Beaver Marsh by Jeffrey Gibson.

    Cuyahoga Valley

    National Park Ohio

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  • Towpath Trail Closure

    Towpath Trail is closed from Mustill Store to Memorial Parkway for riverbank reinforcement. Detours posted. Closure will last 1 - 4 weeks into August. More »

  • Other Closures

    Valley Bridle Trail south of SR 303, across from golf course, is collapsed by river. Hard closure. Plateau Trail Bridge, north of Valley Picnic Area is closed. No detours. Plateau & Oak Hill trails are open. More »

  • Riverview Road Repaving

    Riverview Rd is being repaved from the Cuyahoga-Summit Cty line to Peninsula through Mon, 9/15. Road is open but there are still delays due to construction. Allow extra time. More »

Arrye Rosser Wins Regional Freeman Tilden Award

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Date: November 7, 2011
Contact: Mary Pat Doorley, 440-546-5995

NPS_Arrye Rosser_by_NPS_Ted_Toth
NPS/TED TOTH

Brecksville, Ohio - Arrye Rosser, Cuyahoga Valley National Park's Interpretation and Education Specialist, has been awarded the Midwest Region Freeman Tilden Award for excellence in interpretation.

Rosser is now under consideration, along with six other regional winners, to receive the national award which will be presented in November at the National Association for Interpretation's annual workshop.

The Freeman Tilden Award is one of the highest awards presented to an individual National Park Service interpreter. The award is presented annually and recognizes outstanding contributions to the practice of interpretation and education by a National Park Service (NPS) employee.

Rosser was nominated for her project to introduce questing as a new visitor experience in Cuyahoga Valley National Park and the Ohio & Erie Canalway, a national heritage area. Quests are treasure hunts created by community members (in this case partners, volunteers, and teachers) based on their cultural and natural history research. Through rhyming clues and a map, developers express what makes a place special. Quests lead to a hidden box, where participants collect a quest box stamp and sign a log book. The first phase of quest development introduced 22 quests in late 2010. The quests help participants understand the stories and significance of each quest location. They also help visitors have fun and encourage exploration of other quest locations.

"We are proud of Arrye's enthusiasm and creativity in introducing questing to Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Questing is new to this country and through her initiative, Cuyahoga Valley National Park is reaching audiences in a new and unique way. We are hopeful she will compete well on the national level," said Mike Reynolds, Director, Midwest Region.

The Freeman Tilden Award is sponsored in partnership by the National Park Service and the National Parks Conservation Association. It is named for Freeman Tilden, the author of The National Parks, What They Mean to You and Me and Interpreting Our Heritage. Tilden's writings have had considerable influence on interpretation and education programs within the NPS. The award was created in 1982 to stimulate and reward creative thinking and work that has positive effects on park visitors. Nominees are judged on creativity, originality and contributions to enhanced public understanding of the Park Service and the resources it protects.

Cuyahoga Valley National Park encompasses 33,000 acres along the Cuyahoga River between Cleveland and Akron, Ohio. Managed by the National Park Service, CVNP combines cultural, historical, recreational, and natural activities in one setting. For more information visit www.nps.gov/cuva or www.dayinthevalley.com or call 330-657-2752 or 800-257-9477.

-NPS-

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Did You Know?

Aerial view of the winding Cuyahoga River.

Cuyahoga Valley National Park's namesake river flows north and south. The Cuyahoga River begins its 100 mile journey in Geauga County, flows south to Cuyahoga Falls where it turns sharply north and flows through CVNP. American Indians referred to the U-shaped river as Cuyahoga or "crooked river."