• Photo of the Beaver Marsh by Jeffrey Gibson.

    Cuyahoga Valley

    National Park Ohio

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  • NPS Seeks Comment on Proposed Regulation for Off-Road Bicycle Trails

    NPShas proposed a special regulation to designate and authorize off-road bicycle use on new trails constructed outside of developed areas in Cuyahoga Valley National Park. The public is invited to provide comment until Monday, December 15, 2014. More »

  • Other Closures

    Valley Bridle Trail south of SR 303, across from golf course, is collapsed by river. Hard closure. Plateau Trail Bridge, north of Valley Picnic Area is closed. No detours. Plateau & Oak Hill trails are open. More »

Home Delivery

Standard Oil delivery truck

Delivery trucks brought milk, ice, food, oil (above), and other necessities to homes and businesses.

NPS Collection

During the 19th and early 20th centuries, Cuyahoga Valley families purchased goods through a large home-shopping network that brought dairy products, bread, fruits, vegetables, ice, coal, oil, and tea directly to their farmstead. From carts drawn by horses or cattle, delivery men sold most food items that a family needed to survive. The milk delivery business was especially competitive around the Cuyahoga Valley. In the morning, the milkman left a quart-sized bottle of milk, cottage cheese, and other requested dairy products outside the home's side door. To order more milk, the family left a note for the milkman outside in the empty bottles.

 
Oral history audio.

In Their Own Words
Click the topics to hear stories about Cuyahoga Valley life.
Click here to read the text file.

Milk Delivery (39 seconds)
A Shave and Tie for the Milkman (21 seconds)
Ott Wilson, who worked on Hale Farm in the 1930s, describes his father's milk delivery business and why his father always looked his best.


Did You Know?

Historic photo of canal boats along the Ohio & Erie Canal.

The Ohio & Erie Canal, which runs through Cuyahoga Valley National Park, was a 308-mile waterway connecting Lake Erie to the Ohio River. This transportation route, which influenced local and national prosperity, was dug entirely by hand by mostly German and Irish immigrants.