A Handbook for Managers of Cultural Landscapes with Natural Resource Values Conservation Study Institute
San Francisco Bay, California, photo by Nora Mitchell
San Francisco Bay, California, photo by Nora Mitchell
Executive Summary
Introduction
An Overview of Cultural Landscape Preservation
Methodology
Findings
An Overview of the Case Studies
Gathering and Utilizing Information
Communications: Getting Staff to Work Together
The Management Planning Process
Working with Others Outside the Site
Needs Assessment
Bibliography
Appendices
Findings Golden Gate Bridge, photo by Nora Mitchell
View Case Studies

Working with Others Outside the Site


photo by Laura Rotegard
Volunteers work with the staff of the Blue Ridge Parkway to assess views in Alleghany County, North Carolina.

Many case studies illustrate that parks and protected areas no longer work in isolation. Consequently, it can be useful for resource managers to be aware of the views and values of site visitors and surrounding communities, and to recognize that the interests of stakeholders in the public are not homogeneous. It may be important to bring members of the public into the decision-making process so that they can contribute their knowledge and also understand the reasons that shape decisions. This can help to build a constituency more willing to support resource protection. In some areas, local opposition to federal ownership can mean that a federal-private or federal-state partnership is the only way to manage a site and that a management program needs to be based on a complex of interests and long-term vision of the future..

Education is important in that it creates good stewards and a constituency for protection of natural, cultural, and scenic resources. If there is a collaborative method to directly involve the public, people gain a greater appreciation for a site, its mission, and its resources. (See Blue Ridge Parkway case study for more information on the view area scenic quality assessment process.)

Cultural landscapes involve not only resource protection but protection of all the values of the place, often including intangible values based on meanings and associations. As an example, it is important to work with indigenous people to understand their traditional knowledge of the places they hold sacred, which are often natural rather than built resources.

Tools and Approaches

Advisory Committee

The use of an advisory committee with representation from a site's surrounding community, including local government entities and special interests, has proven to be an effective means of building local support. In the case of Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, an advisory committee was created legislatively when the preserve was established, and was involved in developing the preserve's general management plan.

Advice from Interviewees

The use of an advisory committee with representation from a site's surrounding community, including local government entities and special interests, has proven to be an effective means of building local support. In the case of Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve, an advisory committee was created legislatively when the preserve was established, and was involved in developing the preserve's general management plan.

Respect the Public at Public Meetings

It was suggested that, during public hearings, those conducting the meetings should be respectful of people's time. Avoiding revisiting issues that have been addressed at previous public meetings is one way to do this. Otherwise, those conducting the meetings may be viewed as indecisive or as wasting citizens' time.

Respect Your Neighbor's Management Style

If there are differences in the management styles of the staff at a site and the neighboring property owners, it is important to respect the neighbors' management styles and decisions. Often there is more common ground than there are differences, so try to focus on the common areas.

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