World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument

About the Park

Spanning nearly all of the Pacific Ocean, World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument preserves and interprets the stories and key events in the Pacific Theater leading up to the U.S. entering World War II, its impacts on the mainland, through to the Peace Treaty in Tokyo Bay, Japan ending the war.
Climate change presents significant risks and challenges to the National Park Service and specifically to the National Monument. Scientists cannot predict with certainty the general severity of climate change nor its impacts. Average global temperatures on the Earth’s surface have increased about 1.1°F since the late 19th century, and the 10 warmest years of the 20th century all occurred in the last 15 years.

World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument

Rising global temperatures will further raise sea levels and affect all aspects of the water cycle, including snow cover, mountain glaciers, spring runoff, water temperature, and aquatic life. Climate change is also expected to affect human health, crop production, animal and plant habitats, and many other features of our natural and managed environments.

At the National Monument, increasing temperatures, and changing precipitation patterns may alter park ecosystems, changing vegetation communities, habitats available for species, and the experience of park visitors. These climate-related changes can, over time, impact the critical historic resources that still exist not just in Hawai’i, but all throughout the range of the Pacific War. Significant historic structures, landscapes and archaeological sites are at risk from deterioration and loss due to more frequent violent weather patterns, changes in precipitation, and changes in floral and faunal assemblages.

This Action Plan identifies steps that the National Monument can undertake to reduce GHG emissions mitigate its impact on climate change. The plan presents the park’s emission reduction goals, and associated reduction actions to achieve the park’s goals. While the plan provides a framework needed to meet the park’s emission reduction, it is not intended to provide detailed instructions on how to implement each of the proposed measures. The National Monument will continue its efforts at sustainability by presenting to the public documentation on our efforts at a variety of sustainability issues, including decreasing our GHG emissions.

Emissions Profile

GHG emissions result from the combustion of fossil fuels for transportation and energy (e.g., boilers, electricity generation), the decomposition of waste and other organic matter, and the volatilization or release of gases from various other sources (e.g., fertilizers and refrigerants).

In 2008, GHG emissions within the National Monument totaled 373 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (MTCO2E). This includes emissions from park and concessioner operations. For perspective, a typical single family home in the U.S. produces approximately 11 MTCO2 per year (U.S. EPA, Greenhouse Gases Equivalencies Calculators – Calculations and References, Retrieved, Website: http://www.epa.gov/cleanenergy/energy-resources/calculator.html ). Thus, the combined emissions from park and concessioner operations within the park are roughly equivalent to the emissions from the electricity use of 33 households each year.

The largest emission sector for the National Monument is Energy, totaling 293 MTCO2E. The graph below, taken from our Climate Action Plan, shows our baseline emissions in 2008 broken down into sectors, including visitor travel.

The graph below, taken from our Climate Action Plan, shows our baseline emissions in 2008 broken down into sectors, including visitor travel.

Graph of GHG Emissions

Goals

The National Monument intends to:

  • Reduce 2008 energy GHG emissions from park operations by 20 percent by 2016.
  • Reduce 2008 transportation GHG emissions from park operations by 20 percent by 2016.
  • Reduce 2008 waste GHG emissions from park operations by 10 percent by 2016.
  • Reduce total 2008 park GHG emissions, including concessioners, by 20 percent by 2016.
To read more about what we are doing at the National Monument about climate change, check out our Action Plan!