Lewis and Clark National Historical Park

About the Park

Lewis and Clark National Historical Park encompasses sites along the Columbia River and the Pacific Coast. The historic Fort Clatsop site was established as a national memorial in 1958 to commemorate the culmination and 1805-06 winter encampment of the Lewis and Clark Expedition on the Oregon coast. In 2004 Congress authorized the expansion of the park from 125 to more than 3,200 acres, including several new units with important historic links to the famous expedition.

Lewis and Clark National Historical Park

Climate change presents significant risks and challenges to the National Park Service and specifically to Lewis and Clark National Historical Park. Scientists cannot predict with certainty the general severity of climate change nor its impacts. Average global temperatures on the Earth’s surface have increased about 1.1°F since the late 19th century, and the 10 warmest years of the 20th century all occurred in the last 15 years. The single leading cause of this warming is the buildup of GHGs in the atmosphere—primarily carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O)—which trap heat that otherwise would be released into space.

At Lewis and Clark National Historical Park, increasing temperatures, and changing precipitation patterns may alter park ecosystems, changing vegetation communities, habitats available for species, and the experience of park visitors.

Emissions Profile

In 2007, GHG emissions within Lewis and Clark National Historical Park totaled 188 metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent (MTCO2E). This includes emissions from park and concessioner operations and visitor activities, including vehicle use within the park.

The largest emission sector for Lewis and Clark National Historical Park is energy, totaling 159 MTCO2E , which is directly related to electrical and natural gas consumption for all building operations. The graph below, taken from our Climate Action Plan, shows our baseline emissions in 2007 broken down into sectors, including visitor travel.

The graph below, taken from our Climate Action Plan, shows our baseline emissions in 2007 broken down into sectors, including visitor travel.

Graph of GHG Emissions

Goal

Lewis and Clark National Historical Park intends to:

  • Reduce GHG emissions from the park to 35% below 2007 levels by the year 2016 by implementing emission mitigation actions identified by the park.

To read more about what we are doing at Lewis and Clark National Historical Park about climate change, check out our Action Plan