Places

Makeshift hospitals for the wounded, private homes turned into battle headquarters, and more memorials than one can count - a wide variety of structures and sites were either directly affected by the Civil War, or later built in commemoration of it. And not surprisingly, as the caretaker of America's treasures, including battlefields and military parks, hundreds of the sites that still remain are today located within the National Park System.

Places from Places

Showing results 21-25 of 63

  • Pea Ridge National Military Park

    Elkhorn Tavern

    c. 1880s photo of the Cox family in front of the tavern

    This wooden tavern - destroyed by the battle and later rebuilt - was witness to some of the heaviest fighting during the bloody two-day Battle of Pea Ridge in 1862. Read more

  • Dry Tortugas National Park

    Fort Jefferson

    Photo of Fort Jefferson

    Fort Jefferson, the largest all-masonry fort in the United States, was built between 1846 and 1875 to protect the nation's gateway to the Gulf of Mexico. During the Civil War, it was used as a Federal prison primarily for Union deserters, though in 1865 three of the Lincoln conspirators were imprisoned within its walls. Read more

  • Fort Point National Historic Site

    Fort Point

    Photo of interior of Fort Point, 1865

    Although the popular imagination does not usually associate California with the Civil War, the U.S. military did have a number of strategic fortifications here, such as Fort Point. Many Californians returned East to fight, and society in California was divided. After the war, many Confederates sought a new start far from the devastation they had witnessed during the war. Read more

  • Fort Stevens

    Photo of the officers and men of Company F, 3rd Massachusetts Heavy Artillery in Fort Stevens in 1865

    Fort Stevens is one of many fortifications that surrounded Washington DC during the Civil War and the place where President Abraham Lincoln came under fire from Confederate forces. Read more

  • Homestead National Monument of America

    Freeman School

    Photo of desks and stove inside the Freeman School

    The Freeman School has no known connection with the Civil War, but is part of a larger American story - the yearning of common Americans for a new start and a chance to settle down and build a better future for their children. This desire led to the Free Soil movement which gave rise to the Republican Party and the Homestead Act. Read more