• Climbers on Morning Glory Spire

    City Of Rocks

    National Reserve Idaho

Smoky Mountain Yurts

Yurt

Pinyon Yurt

Kristen Bastis

What is a yurt?

A yurt is a modern adaptation of the ancient shelter used for centuries by Central Asian nomads. Though generally classified as a tent, the yurt is much stronger and weather-tight. The structure is constructed on a wooden deck. A transparent dome with ceiling fan allows for ventilation and views of the night sky.

 
Yurt Interior

Yurt Interior

Juanita Jones

What is inside?

Guests will find a spacious 18-foot diameter living area that accommodates up to six occupants. Furniture includes a table, six stools, a hutch for storage and food preparation, and a wood-burning fireplace for heating. Two bunk beds (twin over full) allows for a maximum of six individuals. Bedding is NOT provided.

The yurts are equipped with electricity, including a fan, light, and receptacles. Water is located at an outside spigot, and guests are welcome to use the campground showers and flush toilets a few hundred feet away. A fire ring and picnic table are also provided outside the yurt. A cooking stove is NOT provided.

What is the rental fee?

The yurts are currently available for $50 a night. For reservations: ReserveAmerica.com.

Rules:

  • Pets are not allowed inside the yurt
  • Smoking in the yurt is strictly prohibited
  • Guests may not pitch tents or park other camping units at the yurt site.
  • Confine outside campfires to the designated fire ring provided.
  • Quiet hours are from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m.
  • Guests are responsible for damages in excess of normal wear and tear, and are responsible for any missing items.
  • At no time may more than 6 people occupy the yurt
  • Fee includes up to two vehicles in the designated parking area. Additional vehicles may park at the equestrian trail head and requires a $5 fee/vehicle.
  • Check in = 3 p.m. Check out = 12 p.m.

Did You Know?

Wagon at Register Rock

The timeless scenery of City of Rocks National Reserve is broad and expansive yet accessible and intimate. People develop a personal relationship with this landscape as evidenced by pioneer journals and comments from modern-day visitors.