• Charles Pinckney

    National Historic Site South Carolina

Your Safety

Charles Pinckney National Historic Site commemorates Charles Pinckney’s life of public service and contributions as a principal framer of the United States Constitution, and preserves a remnant of his 715-acre coastal plantation, Snee Farm. There is much to discover here, but some safety precautions are necessary.

The area is partially wooded and many wild animals still live here. Raccoons, foxes, squirrels, snakes, lizards and others are interesting to watch, but can be dangerous. Always give wild animals plenty of room.

Beware of fire ant mounds.

As in any National Park Service area, there may be tripping and falling hazards. These include natural areas, archeological excavations, and historic buildings and features. You can be injured and fragile resources can be irreparably damaged, so watch your step.

Be careful when exploring areas with lots of vegetation. Briars and poison ivy are a part of the natural landscape.

As part of the National Park System, everything here is protected, even the rocks and grass. Never remove or disturb any plant, animal, artifact, etc.

Use insect repellent in the warmer months. Mosquitos, ticks, chiggers and gnats are present.

Summer here is hot and humid. Drink plenty of water and take frequent breaks out of the sun.

Skates and skating are not permitted anywhere inside the park boundary. This restriction includes, but is not limited to, skateboards, roller skates, inline skates, and skate shoes such as Heelys.

Did You Know?

Portrait of Charles Pinckney, circa 1787

Charles Pinckney National Historic Site is the only site in the National Park System that was owned by a signer of the United States Constitution. Charles Pinckney National Historic Site, SC