• The working watermen community of Tangier Island VA at sunset. Photo by Starke Jett.

    Chesapeake Bay

Indigenous Cultural Landscapes

Chicone-Creek-compressed

Chicone Creek, a tributary of the Nanticoke River, on the Eastern Shore of Maryland

NPS

Indigenous cultural landscapes are evocative of the natural and cultural resources supporting American Indian lifeways and settlement patterns in the early 17th century. Important to descendant communities today, and to conservation strategies in the Chesapeake, this approach to understanding large landscapes is in ongoing research. Read the initial paper that was included in the management plan for the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail.

Completed reports include a prototype methodology summary with recommendations for further research, and a pilot study of the Nanticoke River watershed using this prototype methodology. Further research is planned for other watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay area.

Did You Know?

One of the many wading birds found in the Bay watershed

The water in the Chesapeake Bay is surprisingly shallow. Although the Bay covers a large surface area, its average depth, including all tidal tributaries, is about 21 feet. In fact, a person who is six feet tall could wade through over 700,000 acres of the Bay and never get his or her hat wet.