• Three kayakers enjoying the river.

    Chattahoochee River

    National Recreation Area Georgia

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  • Rising River Waters Can Kill!

    Watch for rapidly rising river levels on the Chattahoochee River and its tributaries. Water released from dams and heavy rain can turn a day on the river into a tragedy! More »

  • Call for Water Release Schedule

    With colder temperatures you can expect longer and more frequent water releases. For water release schedule info, call 1-855-DAM-FLOW (1-855-326-3569) for Buford Dam and 404-329-1455 for Morgan Falls Dam. Save numbers to your cell! More »

Weather

Temperature
The area experiences all four seasons. Summers typically consist of long spells of warm and humid weather. Average afternoon high temperatures are in the lower 90s Readings of 90 or higher can be expected on 70 to 80 days. Overnight lows usually range from the upper 60s to lower 70s.

Temperatures during winter months are more variable. Oftentimes, stretches of mild weather will alternate with cold spells. Winter high temperatures average in the mid 50s to lower 60s. Lows average in the mid 30s. Lows of 32 degrees or lower can be expected on 40 to 50 days.

Spring and Autumn seasons are characterized by much variability from day to day and from year to year. The average date of first freeze is in mid-November. The average date of the last freeze in the spring is in mid to late March.

Precipitation
A measurable amount of rain falls on about 120 days each year, the average annual total amount averaging between 45 and 50 inches. As for snowfall, the average annual total is less than one inch.

Averaging over many years, the driest months are September and October with March being the wettest month. Thunderstorms are common in the spring and summer months. In a typical year, thunder will be heard on 50 to 60 days.

Did You Know?

Hickory Horned Devil

While many caterpillars make cocoons to molt into moths and butterflies, some, like the Hickory Horned Devil, bury themselves in the ground over the winter emerging in the Spring fully changed.