• Three kayakers enjoying the river.

    Chattahoochee River

    National Recreation Area Georgia

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  • Johnson Ferry Intermittent Trail Closures

    Representatives of Colonial Pipeline Company will be working on the gas pipeline in the Johnson Ferry North unit. The work will require intermittent trail closures. For your safety please stay on designated trails and obey all trail closures.

Preserve Park Resources, Recycle Your Christmas Trees

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Date: December 15, 2006
Contact: Nancy Poe, Chief of Resource Education, 678-538-1241 (work), 770-318-1209 (cell)

Each year following the holidays, the Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area runs victim to the illegal dumping of Christmas trees and other types of debris. Not only does removal of the waste cost the park significantly, but the trees could potentially contain contaminants, which pose a threat to the flora and fauna of the local environment.

The Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area supports Keep Georgia Beautiful, and encourages the public’s participation in the Bring One for the Chipper program.

On January 6, 2007, Keep Georgia Beautiful will hold its annual Christmas tree recycling event at locations throughout the state. Participating drop-off points include Home Depot stores in and around the Atlanta area, the Chamblee Civic Center, and several other locations. For the site nearest you, please visit http://www.KeepGeorgiaBeautiful.org

Lend your support to the National Park Service by recycling your Christmas tree with the Keep Georgia Beautiful program. Discard your lawn clippings and other debris in designated trash receptacles as well. As a reminder, depositing any sort of waste materials onto National Park Service grounds is illegal and will not be tolerated. Violators will be prosecuted by law. Park authorities strongly encourage anyone who sights illegal activity in the park to report such activity to park dispatch at 770-952-0378.      

Did You Know?

Hickory Horned Devil

While many caterpillars make cocoons to molt into moths and butterflies, some, like the Hickory Horned Devil, bury themselves in the ground over the winter emerging in the Spring fully changed.