• Three kayakers enjoying the river.

    Chattahoochee River

    National Recreation Area Georgia

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Rising River Waters Can Kill!

    Watch for rapidly rising river levels on the Chattahoochee River and its tributaries. Water released from dams and heavy rain can turn a day on the river into a tragedy! More »

  • Call for Water Release Schedule

    With colder temperatures you can expect longer and more frequent water releases. For water release schedule info, call 1-855-DAM-FLOW (1-855-326-3569) for Buford Dam and 404-329-1455 for Morgan Falls Dam. Save numbers to your cell! More »

Teacher - Ranger - Teacher

Teacher-Ranger-Teacher Logo

The Teacher-Ranger-Teacher (TRT) program is an extended professional development opportunity for educators from K -12 schools to learn about the resources and educational materials available through the National Park Service. Teachers participating in TRT will have the opportunity to engage in parks and park resources, participate in a webinar about lesson planning, develop at least one lesson to be used in their classroom or school, assist the park with an education project, and increase their understanding of place-based learning. Administration of the program, professional development hours, and graduate credit hours will be made available to participants through a cooperative agreement with the University of Colorado, Denver.

The emphasis of this program is to link national park units and teachers from schools with underserved student populations in urban and rural school districts. TRTs perform various tasks depending on their interests and the needs of the park that focus on education programs of the National Park Service. TRTs spend most of their time engaging with park education projects, learning about park resources, and developing lesson plans to use in their classrooms and in the park with students. Their experience will also include exposure to a variety of work performed in national park units by employees from many career fields. When TRTs return to the schools in the fall, they spend part of their classroom time presenting their TRT projects to their own students and to a wider education audience. These presentations can be connected to the National Park Service outreach during National Park Week in April or at other times during the school year.

Program Goals

  • Provide teachers with place-based learning experiences,
  • Provide access to the rich resources of the national parks for inclusion into classrooms and schools,
  • Provide teachers with new knowledge and teacher skills related to the resources and themes interpreted in the National Park Service, and
  • Provide parks with the expertise of teachers to inform and shape park education programs and services.
 
Ms. Dina making a point with some of her students during National Park Week.

Ms. Dina making a point with some of her students during National Park Week.

Teacher-Ranger-Teachers at the Chattahoochee

The park will hire several Teacher-Rangers for the summer of 2013. The Teacher-Rangers will work 30 hours per week for 6 weeks. The work week will consist of three 8-hour days and one 6-hour day with work on Saturdays required. The workday will begin and/or end at the park headquarters at 1978 Island Ford Parkway, Sandy Springs, Georgia. Occasionally the workday will begin and/or end at various park units. The Teacher-Range will be paid $3000 for the summer. The park will provide an official Teacher-Ranger uniform and any safety equipment that may be required to perform the job.

The duties of the Teacher- Rangers may include developing and presenting the following:

  • Junior Ranger activities
  • Summer camp activities
  • Educational podcast
  • Professional development
  • Family programs
  • America's Great Outdoors activities
  • Working with youth organizations
  • Tie Common Core Standards to programs
  • STEM Education materials/activities
  • Creating online connections to students
  • Networking with local schools/districts
  • Incorporate Technology into NPS programs
  • Healthy People/Healthy Parks projects

The Teacher-Rangers may be required to:

  • Maintain a positive and willing attitude
  • Walk on uneven terrain in various weather conditions
  • Learn about the natural, cultural, and historic resources of the park.
  • Maintain a daily log of your activities to be turned in your final day.
  • Participate in occasional park-wide programs.
  • Learn how to use the park phone system and set building alarms.
  • Interact with park visitors about rules and regulations pertaining to life jacket (PFD) use, pets in the park, bicycle use, etc.
  • Maintain a valid driver's license and drive park automobiles, trucks, or vans
  • Participate in on-site training.

During the school year, the Teacher-Rangers will bring national parks into the classroom by developing and presenting curriculum-based lessons that draw on their summer experience in the park. In April, during National Park Week, Teacher-Rangers wear their TRT uniform to school, discuss their summer as a park ranger, and engage students and other teachers in activities that relate to America's national parks.

 

How to Apply

If you have any questions about the program at the park please contact Marjorie Thomas, Park Education Coordinator by e-mail at e-mail us or by phone at 678-538-1243. To apply for an exciting summer as a Teacher-Range at the park please download and complete the application (fillable pdf). Submit your completed application with the attached principal approval letter signed, letter of support from a colleague, and a resume to the park.

By e-mail:
e-mail us

By FAX:
770-399-8087

By Mail:
Chattahoochee River NRA
Attn. Teacher-Ranger-Teacher
1978 Island Ford Parkway
Sandy Springs, GA 30350

Remember, the application deadline is March 1, 2013!

Did You Know?

Great Blue Heron hunting for food - Photo by Tom Wilson

Great Blue Herons stand up to four feet tall and have special feathers that dissolve into powder. They use a serrated middle claw to distribute the powder which they use for preening or cleaning themselves.