• Sit for a spell under a cottonwood tree and view the Franklin Mountains, seemingly nestled between the U.S. and Mexico flags in front of the visitor center. The two flags reflect our heritage; this land once belonging to Mexico and now to the U.S.

    Chamizal

    National Memorial Texas

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  • Alcohol Ban for Visitor Safety

    From June 1 through August 31, the consumption or possession of alcoholic beverages without a permit is prohibited. During Music Under the Stars concerts, alcohol may be purchased within the memorial boundary. More »

  • Construction Activity Near E Paisano Drive and S San Marcial Street

    If entering the park from E Paisano Drive and S Marcial Street please be extra cautious. Pay close attention to the temporary road signs during the ongoing construction activity there.

Multimedia Presentations

This concrete boundary marker along the edge of Chamizal National Memorial marks the historic boundary between the United States and Mexico.

Chamizal Speaks contains videos of Chamizal's park rangers giving public talks on various subjects.
Chamizal Speaks contiene videos de los guardaparques de El Chamizal hablandole al publico sobre varios temas. (en Ingles)

 
Chami, our mascot, is a spotted ground squirrel that teaches visitors and school groups about the importance of wildlife protection.

Just for Fun is a collection of videos featuring park rangers having fun on the job.
Just for Fun es una coleccion de videos presentando a los guardaparques divirtiendose en el trabajo.

 
Chamizal National Memorial Visitor Center

Chamizal FYI provides visitors with information about the memorial, safety videos, and our introductory park videos.

 

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Did You Know?

U.S President Lyndon B. Johnson and Mexican President Lopez Mateos

During the talks that led up to the Chamizal Convention, instead of rendering handshakes, both Presidents Kennedy and Johnson were encouraged to greet their Mexican counterparts with an Abrazo – a customary embrace that is still widely practiced in the Southwest.