• Capulin Volcano National Monument by J. Unruh

    Capulin Volcano

    National Monument New Mexico

Our Staff & Offices

Park Management and Administration
Superintendent Peter Armato

The superintendent's office oversees all activities related to park-wide administrative, managerial, and support functions, as well as safety and planning. In addition, our superintendent is responsible for working with external constituencies in order to develop valuable park partnerships.

Interpretation and Visitor Services
Lead Park Ranger Lynn Cartmell

The interpretive division is primarily responsible for visitor services. Park rangers and guides in the interpretive division conduct activities that allow visitors to make intellectual and emotional connections to Capulin Volcano and the National Park Service. From guided hikes to night sky programs, these rangers help people from childhood through adulthood to experience and learn about the park's resources.

Resource Management
Acting Natural Resource Manager Zach Cartmell

Resource management at Capulin Volcano encompasses activities related to the management, preservation, and protection of the park's natural and cultural resources. Resource Management is responsible for ecosystem monitoring, restoration efforts, exotic/invasive species management, climate change response, natural resource education, and a variety of other activities regarding general resource protection.

Facilities Management
Maintenance Work Supervisor Virginia Tavarez

Facilities management, or maintenance, includes all activities designed to preserve and prolong the use park facilities and assets. From building renovation and roadway maintenance to water sampling and trash pickup, facilities management at Capulin Volcano ensures the preservation of park resources allowing visitors and staff to safely enjoy the park.

 

Did You Know?

Black and white photograph of Folsom projectile point.

Distinctive projectile points found in 1928 imbedded amongst bones from an extinct Bison stunned archeologists and changed the known date of human arrival in the new world from 3,000 years ago to more than 10,000 years ago. The points were named Folsom after the nearby town.