• Carl Sandburg Home Spring

    Carl Sandburg Home

    National Historic Site North Carolina

Carl Sandburg Student Poetry Contest

poetry contest submissions

Poetry submissions on display during celebration.

NPS Photo

The contest encourages young students to write poetry based on a theme which changes each year. Educators are invited to submit original poems written by their students. Students in grades 3-12 are guided only by an annual theme. Submissions can be written in any style. Poems are judged within grade categories, 3-5th, 6-8th and 9-12th. Winning poets are then invited to share their work at a celebration in their honor.

2014 Poetry Contest Winners Announced!
The theme for 2014 was "movement" in honor of Carl Sandburg's poetry which reflected the movement of his time in nature and social change. You may find the winning poems here.

 
poetry-contest-2013

Student Poets Recognized at the 2013 Carl Sandburg Poetry Contest Reception along with the Park’s 2013 Writer-in-Resident, Katherine Hester (left).

NPS Photo

2013 Poetry Contest Winners Announced!
The theme for 2013 was "Seasons" in honor of Carl Sandburg's poetry which captures the beauty of the landscapes and lives of America. You may find the winning 2013 poems here.

 

2012 Poetry Contest - "Social Activism"
Carl Sandburg was known as the "poet of the people" because he expressed the social struggles of all Americans. He became the voice for those that had none: child laborers, factory workers, soldiers, immigrants and workers of all races. You may find the winning 2012 poems here.

 
Student Poets Recognized at the 2011 Carl Sandburg Poetry Contest Reception

Student Poets Recognized at the 2011 Carl Sandburg Poetry Contest Reception along with the Park’s Writer-in-Resident, Jane Sadusky (right), and the park's Education Program Coordinator Ginger Cox (left).

NPS Photo

2011 Student Poetry Contest
The theme for 2011 was "places". You may find the winning poems here.

Did You Know?

Book recycling

The Sandburgs were experts in recycling and reusing. The museum collection is full of repurposed objects, such as envelopes cut on three sides to form filing folders and this law book that was converted into a cookbook to hold recipes.