• Carl Sandburg Home Spring

    Carl Sandburg Home

    National Historic Site North Carolina

Establishing the Park

Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site was the first national park unit to honor the life, works and memory of an American poet. The site was established within the Department of Interior in 1968, one year after Sandburg's death.

Shortly after the death of Carl Sandburg on July 22, 1967, Congressman Roy Taylor (NC) and Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall initiated action that would lead to authorization of the Carl Sandburg Farm National Historic Site. Their enthusiasm, plus the cooperation and interest of Mrs. Sandburg, were instrumental in bringing this proposal to fruition. Congressman Taylor introduced the measure (P.L. 90-592, H.R. 13099) in the House of Representatives on September 25, 1967; the Senate version was introduced by Senators Samual J. Ervin, Jr. and B. Everett Jordan (NC).

In late 1967, the National Park Service prepared documents that would provide arguments for and data to be used in (1) the April 1968, National Parks Advisory Board recommendations for this National Historic Site, and in (2) Congressional hearings later that summer. The hearings held by the house committee on Interior and Insular Affairsresulted in a name change from Carl Sandburg Farm to Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site.

President Johnson signed the Congressional authorization bill on October 17, 1968.

Carl Sandburg's legacy is embodied in this place set aside as a National Historic Site for the preservation and enjoyment of future generations. The National Park Service continues to work to preserve and protect over 300,000 objects and to tell the endless stories of how Carl Sandburg lived and how his life and works have helped shape this nation.

Did You Know?

photo of a young Carl (Charlie) Sandburg posing for his confirmation picture; circa 1890.

Carl Sandburg, who won two Pulitzer prizes and entertained heads of state, presidents, and Hollywood movie stars, only formally graduated from the eighth grade. He attended college classes for four years, but never received a degree.