• Courtesy of Charles Ward

    Cane River Creole

    National Historical Park Louisiana

Artifacts to be on loan to Smithsonian.

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Date: March 27, 2013

Public Meeting About Loan of National Park Artifacts to the Smithsonian's New Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C.

Natchitoches, LA: Cane River Creole National Historical Park has been working with the Smithsonian's new National Museum of African American History & Culture about a potential partnership project. The Smithsonian is interested in the long-term loan of a number of museum artifacts from the park's collection. The Smithsonian proposes to use the artifacts in its exhibits now being developed that interpret the history and culture of African Americans. Smithsonian staff has worked with the national park staff to identify a number of park museum objects and cultural artifacts that would interpret Cane River life and the national African American experience for this new museum under construction on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.. In order to continue this dialogue and gain public comment the national park is hosting a community meeting to discuss the potential loan and exhibition of these nationally-significant Cane River resources. The National Park Service welcomes participation of plantation family descendants, traditionally-associated people, and other interested persons to discuss the inclusion of these artifacts from the park's museum collection in the context of significant national heritage.A presentation of the proposed loan agreement including the artifacts considered for exhibition will be followed by a question-and-answer session and open dialogue in which all attending the meeting may comment on the proposal.

The National Park Service relies heavily on your involvement in to help guide our stewardship of America's great natural and cultural resources.Interested persons are also encouraged to provide comment using the NPS Planning, Environment, and Public Comment (PEPC) system available on-line.Feel free to visit the Public Project Home Page at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/npscarisinmaahc to comment on this proposal.

 

Did You Know?

Crops

Oakland plantation’s first cash crops were tobacco and indigo, followed by cotton in the 1800s. According to family tradition, the Prud’hommes were the first family west of the Mississippi River to farm cotton on a large scale.