• Courtesy of Charles Ward

    Cane River Creole

    National Historical Park Louisiana

Christmas Downriver

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Date: December 6, 2011
Contact: Nathan Hatfield, 318-356-8441

 Celebrate the Holidays

with

Cane River Creole National Historical Park!

Natchitoches Parish- Cane River Creole National Historical Park will celebrate the holiday season throughout the month of December.

 On December 10, visitors are invited to join us at the Magnolia Plantation Complex for live music, refreshments, and crafts. Tours and craft making will be ongoing throughout the day with live music from the LaCour Trio from 1:00-2:30 at the Magnolia Overseer's House. The Magnolia Plantation Complex is located at 5549 Highway 119, Derry, Louisiana 71416. 

The same event will take place at Oakland Plantation the following week on December 17. The LaCour trio will be performing from 1:00 to 2:30, with crafts and tours ongoing throughout the day. Oakland Plantation is located at 4386 Highway 484 Bermuda, Louisiana 71456.

 We also invite everyone to visit the Oakland Plantation Store for all of you holiday gift needs. The store has a wonderful selection of regional book titles, National Park Service memorabilia, mugs, magnets, and even locally produced Mayhaw Jelly. The bookstore is open every day form 8:30am-3:30pm. 

Also on December 17, please visit our friends at the Badin-Roque House for Christmas "Creole Style", 11:00 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Few remaining structures of this "post-in-the-ground " technique exsist in the United States today and on hand will be members of the St. Augustine's Historical Society to showcase and explain the site's signifigance to our cultural landscape. Badin-Roque House is located on Highway 484, about a half mile upriver from St. Augustine church.

The park will be open every day from 8am-4pm except on Thanksgiving, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day.

Did You Know?

Oakland Tenant Houses

The Slave/Tenant Quarters and Ruins at Oakland Plantation are remnants of a larger community, which extended for a quarter-mile southward along the river. After the Civil War, sharecropper and tenant farmer families continued to live in these quarters as late as the 1970s.