• Strike Valley and the Waterpocket Fold

    Capitol Reef

    National Park Utah

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  • Grand Wash Closure

    Due to flooding, the Grand Wash Road is currently closed to vehicles.

Places

Orchards in Bloom
Brenda Zirwas/NPS
 

Visitors to Capitol Reef National park are often curious about the fruit trees that lie within a mile or two of the Visitor Center. These trees, apple, pear, peach, cherry, apricot, mulberry, even Potowatomee Plum, are the most obvious reminder of the pioneer community that once prospered in the narrow valley of the Fremont River. Other places of interest include the Fruita Schoolhouse and the Gifford Homestead.

In these next few pages you can explore some of these places and learn the history behind them.

Did You Know?

Don’t let this happen to you!  Check area forecasts! Vehicle being inspected by park rangers following a flash flood

Less than 0.25 inches (0.6 cm) of rain can produce flash floods. Flash floods are caused by run-off from intense, localized thunderstorms that drop a large amount of rain over a short period of time. They are most common in Capitol Reef in July, August and September, but can occur at any time of the year.