• Spires of Cedar Mesa sandstone in Chesler Park (Needles District)

    Canyonlands

    National Park Utah

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Some unpaved roads are closed

    Recent rains have caused extensive damage to some roads in the Needles District and some of the roads into the Maze District. More »

  • New backcountry requirements in effect

    Hard-sided bear containers are required for backpackers in parts of the Needles District. More »

Support Your Park

An SCA leads a team of volunteers removing grafitti in the Needles District
An SCA leads a team of volunteers removing grafitti in the Needles District
NPS Photo by Neal Herbert
 
Volunteering

Public support is a critical component in the management of National Park Service lands. No other federal agency relies as heavily on the generosity and kindness of its visitors, and we thank you for your past support and look forward to future partnerships.

From volunteering as a campground host to shopping in our bookstores, there are many ways that the public can support Canyonlands and the other parks in southeast Utah:

Monetary Donations

Monetary donations are graciously accepted and directly benefit the park. These funds are used for interpretation, visitor services and safety, as well as resource management programs. If desired, those making a donation may specify a use for their money. For example, if you or someone you know has been involved in a search and rescue (SAR), donations may be made to directly support the park's SAR program.

Donations may be made by check or money order made payable to "National Park Service." Send to:

Superintendent,
Canyonlands National Park
2282 SW Resource Blvd.
Moab, UT 84532

If you are making a donation in someone's honor, please include the name and address of that person and they will receive an acknowledgement note.

Did You Know?

Rapids in Cataract Canyon

The highest recently recorded flow in Cataract Canyon is 114,900 cfs in 1984. However, scientists dating driftwood piles estimate that in 1884, the river may have reached 225,000 cfs. More...