• Spires of Cedar Mesa sandstone in Chesler Park (Needles District)

    Canyonlands

    National Park Utah

There are park alerts in effect.
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  • Extreme Fire Danger

    Due to extremely dry conditions, fire restrictions are in effect in all national park units in Utah. More »

  • New backcountry requirements in effect

    Hard-sided bear containers are required for backpackers in parts of the Needles District. More »

Park Planning

The National Park Service prepares a variety of planning and environmental impact documents to help guide the management of park resources. These documents can range from site-specific impact analyses on facility locations to broader park-wide plans for future use and management.

Public Comment and Review

Current park planning documents are made available for public review via the National Park Service Planning, Environment and Public Comment (PEPC) website. PEPC is an online collaborative tool dedicated to facilitating the NEPA/NHPA process in conservation planning, environmental impact analysis and informed decision-making. PEPC allows parks to improve efficiency and implement agency guidelines.

 

Documents Open for Public Review

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    Other Plans and Projects

    An archive of completed projects as well as projects without documents open for comment may be found on the PEPC website.

     

    Completed Planning Projects

    These additional documents help guide planning and management at Canyonlands.

    Fire and Fuels Management Plan [519k PDF file] and Appendix [723k PDF file]

    Long-Range Interpretive Plan This plan describes goals and issues for visitor experience, interpretation, education, and resource stewardship at Canyonlands National Park. [1.3mb PDF file]

    Backcountry Management Plan Published in 1995, the intent of this plan was to develop backcountry management strategies to protect park resources, provide for high quality visitor experiences, and be flexible to deal with changing conditions. [137k PDF file]

    Did You Know?

    Biological Soil Crust

    The dirt is alive! A living crust called "Biological Soil Crust" covers much of Canyonlands and the surrounding area. Composed of algae, lichens and bacteria, this crust provides a secure foundation for desert plants. Please stay on roads and trails to avoid trampling this important resource. More...