• Spires of Cedar Mesa sandstone in Chesler Park (Needles District)

    Canyonlands

    National Park Utah

There are park alerts in effect.
show Alerts »
  • Some unpaved roads are closed

    Recent rains have caused extensive damage to some roads in the Needles District and some of the roads into the Maze District. More »

  • New backcountry requirements in effect

    Hard-sided bear containers are required for backpackers in parts of the Needles District. More »

Management

"That in order to preserve an area in the State of Utah possessing superlative scenic, scientific, and archeologic features for the inspiration, benefit and use of the public, there is hereby established the Canyonlands National Park..."

This passage from Public Law 88-590 passed by Congress in 1964 set aside a remarkable landscape containing much of the Colorado and Green River basins around their confluence. Those interested in a comprehensive account of the park's beginnings may read From Controversy to Compromise to Cooperation: The Administrative History of Canyonlands National Park. This document offers an in-depth look at how the park was created and the events that shaped it (311 pages). [20mb PDF File]

Guidance Documents

Many documents guide the management of Canyonlands. Those available here are intended to publicize management plans and document how park operations are structured toward achieving the mission of the National Park Service.

Canyonlands' General Management Plan was written in 1978. This plan guides the management of resources, visitor use, and general development in the park. The primary purpose of the plan is to provide a foundation from which to protect park resources while providing for meaningful visitor experiences.

In 2013, the park developed a Foundation Statement to update a shared understanding of the park's purpose, significance, resources and values. This document can serve as a foundation for future planning and management decisions.

Additional documents may be found on the Park Planning page.

Did You Know?

Biological Soil Crust

The dirt is alive! A living crust called "Biological Soil Crust" covers much of Canyonlands and the surrounding area. Composed of algae, lichens and bacteria, this crust provides a secure foundation for desert plants. Please stay on roads and trails to avoid trampling this important resource. More...